inkcanada

curated by screenwriter Karen Walton

— @inkcanada on Twitter.

Tagged film:

kdeveryjacobs:

New poster for my movie Rhymes for Young Ghouls.

Rhymes opens in Toronto January 31, 2014.  Written and directed by Jeff Barnaby, this debut feature is a CFC Features project, premiered at TIFF 13, and was selected as one of TIFF’s Top 10 new Canadian films of the year.  I was an advisor on this project because Jeff’s shorts were smoking’ hot.  Turned out amazing.  Check it out…

Jan 26
kdeveryjacobs:

New poster for my movie Rhymes for Young Ghouls.

Rhymes opens in Toronto January 31, 2014.  Written and directed by Jeff Barnaby, this debut feature is a CFC Features project, premiered at TIFF 13, and was selected as one of TIFF’s Top 10 new Canadian films of the year.  I was an advisor on this project because Jeff’s shorts were smoking’ hot.  Turned out amazing.  Check it out…

Absolutely love this poster, Villeneuve & Co.  

Sep 21
Absolutely love this poster, Villeneuve & Co.  

Congrats to author Ernest Mathijs on this, & thank you U of T Press.

Few studies of Canadian cinema to date have engaged deeply with genre cinema and its connection to Canadian culture. Ernest Mathijs does just that in this volume, which traces the inception, production, and reception of Canada’s internationally renowned horror film, Ginger Snaps (2000). This tongue-in-cheek Gothic film, which centres on two death-obsessed teenage sisters, draws a provocative connection between werewolf monstrosity and female adolescence and boasts a dedicated world-wide fan base.

The first book-length study of this popular film, John Fawcett’s Ginger Snaps is based on the author’s privileged access to most of its cast and crew and to its enthusiasts around the world. Examining themes of genre, feminism, identity, and adolescent belonging, Mathijs concludes that Ginger Snaps deserves to be recognized as part of the Canadian canon, and that it is a model example of the kind of crossover cult film that remains unjustly undervalued by film scholars.” - from the publisher

Aug 31
Congrats to author Ernest Mathijs on this, & thank you U of T Press.
“Few studies of Canadian cinema to date have engaged deeply with genre cinema and its connection to Canadian culture. Ernest Mathijs does just that in this volume, which traces the inception, production, and reception of Canada’s internationally renowned horror film, Ginger Snaps (2000). This tongue-in-cheek Gothic film, which centres on two death-obsessed teenage sisters, draws a provocative connection between werewolf monstrosity and female adolescence and boasts a dedicated world-wide fan base.
The first book-length study of this popular film, John Fawcett’s Ginger Snaps is based on the author’s privileged access to most of its cast and crew and to its enthusiasts around the world. Examining themes of genre, feminism, identity, and adolescent belonging, Mathijs concludes that Ginger Snaps deserves to be recognized as part of the Canadian canon, and that it is a model example of the kind of crossover cult film that remains unjustly undervalued by film scholars.” - from the publisher

inkcanada

Posted on Saturday February 15th 2014 at 08:53am. Its tags are listed below.

Valentine from Mary Margaret O’Hara

inkcanada

Posted on Sunday January 26th 2014 at 01:12pm. Its tags are listed below.

kdeveryjacobs:

New poster for my movie Rhymes for Young Ghouls.

Rhymes opens in Toronto January 31, 2014.  Written and directed by Jeff Barnaby, this debut feature is a CFC Features project, premiered at TIFF 13, and was selected as one of TIFF’s Top 10 new Canadian films of the year.  I was an advisor on this project because Jeff’s shorts were smoking’ hot.  Turned out amazing.  Check it out…

kdeveryjacobs:

New poster for my movie Rhymes for Young Ghouls.

Rhymes opens in Toronto January 31, 2014.  Written and directed by Jeff Barnaby, this debut feature is a CFC Features project, premiered at TIFF 13, and was selected as one of TIFF’s Top 10 new Canadian films of the year.  I was an advisor on this project because Jeff’s shorts were smoking’ hot.  Turned out amazing.  Check it out…

inkcanada

Posted on Saturday September 21st 2013 at 01:22pm. Its tags are listed below.

Absolutely love this poster, Villeneuve & Co.  
Absolutely love this poster, Villeneuve & Co.  

Absolutely love this poster, Villeneuve & Co.  

inkcanada

Posted on Tuesday September 3rd 2013 at 08:09pm. Its tags are listed below.

Promoting has got a bit of a bad rap, because it’s associated with bragging. But if we can flip that to make it a celebration of everyone’s work, then the mission becomes bigger than the project itself.

inkcanada

Posted on Monday September 2nd 2013 at 12:14pm. Its tags are listed below.

There were no rehearsals. Sometimes, I would email them with questions. This is an example: [imagine a lover wanted you back and you loved them, but were full of uncertainty. and they followed you to florida (yes, florida). and you said to them, “you don’t want me back, you only like the idea of us being together”. but they persist. so… you give them a list of 5 things to complete. and you say, “if you still want me back after doing this list… i will come back to you”. what would the 5 things on that list be? can you email me?]
Congrats to author Ernest Mathijs on this, & thank you U of T Press.
“Few studies of Canadian cinema to date have engaged deeply with genre cinema and its connection to Canadian culture. Ernest Mathijs does just that in this volume, which traces the inception, production, and reception of Canada’s internationally renowned horror film, Ginger Snaps (2000). This tongue-in-cheek Gothic film, which centres on two death-obsessed teenage sisters, draws a provocative connection between werewolf monstrosity and female adolescence and boasts a dedicated world-wide fan base.
The first book-length study of this popular film, John Fawcett’s Ginger Snaps is based on the author’s privileged access to most of its cast and crew and to its enthusiasts around the world. Examining themes of genre, feminism, identity, and adolescent belonging, Mathijs concludes that Ginger Snaps deserves to be recognized as part of the Canadian canon, and that it is a model example of the kind of crossover cult film that remains unjustly undervalued by film scholars.” - from the publisher

Congrats to author Ernest Mathijs on this, & thank you U of T Press.

Few studies of Canadian cinema to date have engaged deeply with genre cinema and its connection to Canadian culture. Ernest Mathijs does just that in this volume, which traces the inception, production, and reception of Canada’s internationally renowned horror film, Ginger Snaps (2000). This tongue-in-cheek Gothic film, which centres on two death-obsessed teenage sisters, draws a provocative connection between werewolf monstrosity and female adolescence and boasts a dedicated world-wide fan base.

The first book-length study of this popular film, John Fawcett’s Ginger Snaps is based on the author’s privileged access to most of its cast and crew and to its enthusiasts around the world. Examining themes of genre, feminism, identity, and adolescent belonging, Mathijs concludes that Ginger Snaps deserves to be recognized as part of the Canadian canon, and that it is a model example of the kind of crossover cult film that remains unjustly undervalued by film scholars.” - from the publisher

inkcanada

Posted on Tuesday August 20th 2013 at 08:06am. Its tags are listed below.

Free Tarek Loubani & John Greyson

Canadian Filmmaker John Greyson is an esteemed colleague, a ground-breaking filmmaker and beloved professor at York University here in Toronto.  Please take a moment to read this and help us apply pressure to Canadian and Egyptian officials for his immediate release from a Cairo prison where the circumstances of his arrest & detention are unknown and mystifying to his peers - for four days now. Thank you for your time & consideration of this important appeal for public action on behalf of a great artist.

inkcanada

Posted on Wednesday August 7th 2013 at 07:03am. Its tags are listed below.

…between 1907 and 1909 it became obligatory in many parts of the country for ministers, businessmen, and politicians to inveigh against movies as a corrupter of youth and a threat to public morality. Yet the issue at this point was perhaps less ideological than economic; in becoming a major entertainment industry overnight, the movies suddenly threatened the very substantial revenues of churches, saloons, and vaudeville theatres from coast to coast.
David A Cook, A History of Narrative Film (1981)